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CenturionPro GC1 and GC3 Bucker Review

CenturionPro GC1 and GC3 Bucker Review

A lot of Cannabis connoisseurs insist that buds processed by hand are the best because they are done with precision and look well-grown.

But let’s face it: it is impractical to do things by hand when you run a medium to large-scale operation. Your competitors will beat you, unless you have a battalion of hand trimmers.

Now, hand trimming and speed may not look synonymous, but the CenturionPro GC buckers series aims to make this similarity happen.

With harvest season around the corner, it is imperative to have a reliable bucker that delivers.

So, let us look at how the GC bucker series fair.

 

At First Glance

In case you don’t know, the GC in the CenturionPro offering stands for Gentle Cut.

Compared to the HP or High-Performance series, these buckers focus more on creating a hand-bucked effect on your buds.

So instead of focusing on processing more pounds every hour, the specialty of the GC is producing quality de-stemmed buds.

Like the HP series, the GC also has the same premium build, making it a durable machine.

The GC series comes in two (2) models: the GC1 and the GC3.

 

GC1 Bucker

 

Centurion Pro GC1 Bucker

 

The GC1 is the base model of the series.  It features a tabletop design with the capacity to trim 40 pounds of wet buds, and 8 pounds of dry buds in an hour.

The GC1 effectively replaces up to three (3) workers and can take on plant stems of up to 3/8 inches in diameter.

Unlike other automated buckers that pop off the buds, the GC1 cuts the stem of your plant, giving it a more hand-trimmed feel.

Considering the bar for gentle buckers, the GC1 performs quite well in comparison with other tabletop buckers.

Given the outputs it can produce, the GC1 can process almost four times more than other brands.

The GC1 also uses a continuous duty cycle and active gearing drivetrain for better control and safety.

On the maintenance side, the GC1 uses a cleaning system that collects the cut-up stems into a vacuum bag. That makes cleanup easier for you.

While designed primarily as a tabletop bucker, you can upgrade the GC1 for outdoor use.

Instead of having a separate bucker, you get to save more when you upgrade the GC1 with a bucker stands and industrial caster wheels.

You can upgrade the stand to include off-road wheels and take the GC1 without in the field.

 

GC3 Bucker

 

Centurion Pro GC3 Bucker

 

Now, if you want something that does more but can buck with the same quality, then the GC3 fits the job.

The GC3 is a trio of GC1 buckers, effectively tripling the outputs with the same precise cuts produced by the GC1.

At this point, the GC3 is a good melting point for speed and quality bucking.

As it is, the GC3 can produce outputs that are a few pounds shy of the capacity of entry-level industrial buckers in the market.

But here is where the GC3 shines.

Since it is a set of GC3 buckers in one stand, you get individual stations to use when processing your harvest.

So, if one bogs down due to a jam, you can continue working while troubleshooting one station.

That way, you can still meet your production targets.

Aside from having around 120 pounds wet and 24 pounds dry de-stemming capacity, the GC3 comes with a stand with industrial casters.

You can upgrade the wheels to off-road tires for outdoor use.

 

Conclusion

The GC buckers made high outputs possible without sacrificing quality.

While its outputs are not at par with its industrial counterparts, the GC buckers are powerful on its own, considering the quality of buds you produce with it.

That said, if you insist on looking to process hundreds of pounds in one go, you should look elsewhere.

But if you are really after boutique quality, then the GC series of buckers should be on your shopping list.

Derek Randal

Derek Randal

A self-proclaimed Internet nerd who admits to spending way too much time on Reddit. When Derek isn't spinning new content for the blog, he enjoys playing chess, social card games and relaxing. Derek is also a lover of all things social media, a self-proclaimed coffee ninja, and country music trailblazer.

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